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are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold stand
for germany, which is a positive and will be a good gain forward. but say order box, very weak. demand, very weak. business confidence very weak and this is going to be hitting activity indicators going forward. >> even though the manufacturing side of it disappointed, the services was stronger. while services is a big part of the economy, it's where we're trying to see the rebalancing in the german economy happen. from that point of view, probably a rather encouraging development. >> it is interesting. it's also very exportwise. what we saw on these numbers was german exports falling sharply again. and this is just signaling that global economic conditions, soft patch very weak, particularly for the region -- i'm sorry, within the eurozone itself. >> and it's consistent with the weakening global demand we're seeing out of japan and other areas this morning. but it's not necessarily -- if you look at the details of what this is telling us across the globe, frankly a point to deceleration in activities. >> and maybe the global economy will continue to expand. they will signal that china is co
in the vary sigh settlement and it was obvious that germany could violate that order. beginning around 1922 you had two decades leading to the second world war of the revisionist regime that wanted to revise the structure of global power and the status quo powers. today there is one status quo power and under this administration. >> as to whether these countries are going to enforce this world order? >> look you have three presidents. president clinton, bush and obama have said explicitly a nuclear iran is unacceptable. if the iranians are allowed to walk across that threshold with no opposition that is going to demonstrate to other would be aggressive regimes there is no cop on the street. that is what is happening. >> paul: is this the year of the showdown? >> it's how much industrial mechanics, how much uranium this would be the year. >> paul: there is a computer virus that keeps kicking it down. >> but it's not an ever receiving horizon and they take nuclear stockpiles and how much they have and how deeply it is buried. you saw benjamin netanyahu at the u.n. in september and literally d
showing weakness. germany's central bank cutting its growth forecast saying german gdp will likely only expand 4% next year down from the previous estimate of 1.6%. >>> california attorney general suing delta air lines distributing the fly mobile app without a privacy policy. first in the state legal action under the online privacy law. >>> india is hoping to open big box retailers like wal-mart. they say foreign companies can own a 51% stake in retailers for the first time. >>> they uncovered a drug smuggling tunnel 39 feet below ground and ran 131 feet and equipped with ventilation and electricity systems. >>> 50 shades of gray, announcing at ceo holiday party, every employee getting a $5,000 bonus to celebrate a profitable year. that is today's speed read. i have time to say that every company should do that. [buzzer] $5,000 for everybody. david: i don't know if we could afford it but i wouldn't mind. thank you, lauren. it is incredibly ironic at the same time the national political scene is getting more liberal with the re-election of president obama, politics at the state level is
by or be confined by the weak europe including germany appears to be on the brink of recession. the last quarter was fabulous, best in its history. stocks a half a point off its high. terrific 51% gain since i got behind it on august of 2011. it's not done. i think it has room to run. let's check in with the co-ceo of sap. >> good to see you, jim. >> best third quarter in history. >> yes. >> how is it possible? >> we're focused on the nexus of forces as you mentioned. when we put the strategy of the company together we were determined to double the addressable market. where's the world going? it's going mobile. do you know anyone that doesn't have a mobile device? >> no. and i don't want anything else frankly. >> exactly. more mobile devices in the world than toothbrushes. that was good enough for us to focus on mobile. >> are you still the largest buyer of some mobile devices? >> i don't know in we're the largest but up there. we have done a lot of work with apple no doubt about it. we focused on mobile and big data. data is doubling in the world every 18 months. so it's probably a good idea to
pressure appears to be mounting on bashar al-asaad as the u.s., germany and th and the netherlands will be sending troops and weapons. >> as part of the absolute unity that we all have on this issue, we have sent an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line. and those responsible would be held to account. >> this comes as president assad may be looking for a way out as this pressure is mounting. we understand he sent an envoy to latin america seeking asylum from countries such as cuba, venezuela or ecuador. his deputy foreign minister denies that claim. syrian rebels are ming closer and closer to damascus. the airport outside of damascus remains to be closed. there are some flights going in and out of there. the international community is no longer flying in and out. we are hearing more and more records of fighting near damascus getting closer to the presidential palace. all this appears to be mounting pressure on the assad regime. anybody predicting the assad regime will fall anytime soon, it's a theory that has been floated for several years and it hasn't come to be.
this. if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape. they've done better trading against the world, their companies are making money. so a lot of the things we heard that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [la
-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 2013. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no jet lag. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-866-294-5409
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
2007. but prior to this, ambassador burt was the u.s. ambassador to the federal republic of germany from 85-89. and before that worked in the state department assistant secretary of state for european and canadian affairs from 1983-85. and before that was the direct of political military affairs in the department of state. so he, along with his colleagues, has a long and imminent involvement in these issues. and, finally, last but not least, ambassador matlock known to many of us, career ambassador. he's been holding a series of academic posted i'm not going to list them all, since 1991. but during his 35 years in the american foreign service, 1956-91, he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1987-1991. as special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior director for european and soviet affairs on the national security staff from 83-86. and as ambassador to czechoslovakia from 81-83. and i will not go over the rest of his eminent and long career in the interest of time. but i just did want to give you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of co
numbers of irish people and germans who are coming here because of terrible economic situations in germany. and others coming into the united states and posing a lot of problems a lot of people in the northeast, especially in terms of assimilation. a lot of those immigrants go and fight in the u.s. mexico border. the reason they do that is because they don't have opportunities economically in the united states. for the most part, they are not very good soldiers. the san patricio -- those are the deserters from the mexican war. some people think that they were irish because they carry an irish line. but the san patricio's, one can mostly say is that they were mostly catholic. one thing i did didn't talk about in the story is there is an intense tension between the catholicism of mexico and the mainstream protestant beliefs of most americans. a lot of americans actually go to mexico and think that they are going to convert catholics or regain catholicism and basically get red of the catholic thread. i was lucky enough to have a student that was a graduate student who could read german and he
obvious to countries like germany and the new soviet union that they could violate that order with impunity. so, beginning around 1922 you had two decades leading to the second world war of this double process, revisionist regimes that want today revise the structure ofl power and status quo power and today there's only one status quo power and under this administration-- >> is iran test whether these countries, the united states in particular going to enforce this world order? >> look, you have three presidents, president clinton, bush and obama said that nuclear iran is unacceptable. if the iranians are allowed to walk across that threshold with no opposition, that would demonstrat demonstrates other would-be regimes that-- >> is this the year for the showdown on iran? >> simply as a matter of industrial mechanics, how much uranium you need to enrich to get to a bomb this is the year. >> paul: we've been saying that for a while and somehow there's a computer virus that happens that keeps kicking it down. but it's not an ever receding horizon and the international atomic ener
. and it became obvious to countries like germany and the soviet union that this they could violate with impunity. in 1922 you had two decades leading to the second world wharf this -- war of this regime that wanted to revise the structure of global power and the status quo powers who weren't prepared to enforce it. there was one power and under this administration -- >> is iran the test case for whether or not these countries are going -- europe and the united states and in particular are going to enforce this world order? >> look, you have three presidents, president clinton, bush and obama have said explicitly that a nuclear iran is unacceptable. if the iranians are allowed to walk across the flesh hold with no opposition, that will demonstrate to other would t be aggressiveha regimes that there is no comp on the street. and that's what is happening. >> is this the year for the showdown on iran? >> simply is a matter of industrial mechanics, how much uranium you need to enrich. >> we humave been saying that for awhile though. and somehow there is a computer virusn that keeps kicking it down.
situation in germany and other immigrants coming in to the united states and posing a lot of problems, in the northeast especially and assimilation. a lot of immigrants fight on the u.s./mexico war. they don't have economic opportunity. it is not very good soldiers. and the santa true ceo. they're all i ridge men because they carry an irish flag, when they look at the people, the germans too. one thing i didn't talk about is tension between catholicism of mexico and mainstream belief of most americans, a lot of americans go to mexico and convert catholics and redeemed catholicism and immigrants, he always translated german accounts, and the elephant wars a terrible idea. they think it is ridiculous. european are always able to see from the beginning the flaw with this idea, neighboring republic in order to take the territory. there's a lot more i could say about this. i have one more question. [inaudible] >> leader of mexico. >> i will send you all to see -- and not answer that. see for yourself because it is such a wonderful exhibit. thanks so much. [applause] >> visit booktv.org to
at germany. a lot of -- >> hong kong, germany, you name it. >> germany up 29% year-to-date. that has a lot to do with the ucb and the eurozone. this is a relative gain. lost in this conversation for a lot of u.s. investors, they are u.s. investors. they can't really invest globally to the same degree that we talk about, we say germany is up 29%, for a lot of investors that's out of their reach. >> if we didn't have the cliff today, we would have best trades of the year, jamie dimon buying jpmorgan when the whale hit. things looked really dark. some of the best trades happened obviously when it looked like the stocks were in for real trouble. >> look at the greek stock market. look at greek debt. i think it was third point that established a prominent position in greek debt and saw x number of returns thereafter. >> draw the lessons to today. as we teeter on the cliff, what would be the fear trade that people are shunning right now but may turn out to be the best trade looking back? >> i think it's something we already mentioned, and that's the defense sector. >> the sequestration sector is
is it that germany, a country that has 1/4 of the population of the united states, exports more than what the united states does? because if you look at our tax code, that's broken, it needs reform, industries in the united states that are employing americans are given two-year tax credits and we expect those american companies to make generational commitments on a two-year tax credit. you look at places like germany, they're providing 10-year tax credits that sends a signal, a signal of certainty, a signal of clarity to businesses in germany, that there is a commitment to embrace innovation and technology, to remain competitive in the manufacturing economy. manufacturing today is not labor-intensive. it's capital-intensive. you always have to be in a continuous improvement mode. but that requires one thing. it requires a confidence in the american people, a confidence in the american worker, in making the kind of commitments that are necessary to compete with china. i often hear people on this floor, every day, whining about china. yeah, china cheats on their currency. they treat their workers poor
. but a dog knows absolutely instantly when -- instantly. when we lived in germany -- germany, my father was working there, all the police had trained doings on the place and there were no robberies, there were no assaults because people knew that that dog would get them and obviously the security is not working. and children need to be protected. adults need to be protected. and it would be much less expensive and much safer to have a trained dog in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: ok, sara, we got your point. john? guest: i'm not sure if it would be less expensive to have a handler and a dog at every school rather than allowing one person to possess a gun they probably own pivetly, having said that, it's an unfortunate fact i grew up much of my early years in europe and you know, i understand that they had strict gun control laws there. until last friday, the newtown shoot, the top three, in terms of fatality, school shootings in the world were in britain and germany. those were done with assault weapons. just because you have strict gun controls doesn't mean
at all? >> "24" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stunningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like amer
. so we feel very good about france. ditto germany. >> isn't that incredible. >> rick, 52-week high when compared to avon. incredible. thank you so much for joining us. >> good to be here. >> good to see you. >> all right. stay tuned. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! get happy. get geico. >>> trip adviser and deutsche bank. >> deutsche bank likes this company. people love it. trip adviser is king. >> deutsche buying a hold on apache. >> apache has been such a dog. bad for apache. >> an a darko? >> ever since the daily, and other litigation, this is an inexpensive stock. i-like it. >> deutsche on omc. >> what's interesting, they're talking about negative momentum in ad
the markets in switzerland, netherlands, germany do better than us? how is that possible? because of you, washington. it's because of you. we've been kept back all because of you. second, before our politicians stepped in with the intransigence and anger, we were about to have an explosion in earnings. retail was stronger than it was in a decade, autos back incredibly robust. and that's just the beginning. because all the pent up demand. we're running short of office buildings, shopping centers, apartments, homes, these are the hiring sectors, all this blather about helping the small businessman of subchapter "s" for private and middle class, you want to help them? give them a deal, any deal, just get out of our way for heaven sakes. our country is starting to get so competitive, again, that business is building things over there now want to build them there. tim cook tells brian williams that his company's going to make macs in this country. we're better than kmochina. meanwhile our costs are plummeting courtesy of the cleaner, cheaper fuel, natural gas. so cheap here it can be lique li
industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morn 24 hours. zero heartburn. >>> welcome back. states are brace for huge cuts in aid from washington if we go over the fiscal cliff, particularly illinois. some government experts say the state could lose $1 billion in federal revenue. higher than for other states. the pew center is saying that that's because illinois gets 8.5% of its revenue from federal sources, above the 6.6% national average. joining us now to talk more about that and what's at stake for illinoi
an independent freeport, like the city of hamburg in what is now germany. out in the midwest, they were more closely connected to new orleans then to new england. their farm produce went right down mississippi and out to the world through new orleans. they would have been happy to break away from those strange prudish puritanical prigs in massachusetts. what about texas? texas has always wanted to be its own country and it still does. they weren't going to stay in the confederacy. what about california, which in those days before the transcontinental railroad created in 1862, before the railroad, california to the united states. people walking alongside, people sailing for weeks and months around the southern tip of south america. california was eager to go its own way. secession in other words was a tiger that might bite in any direction. andrew johnson of tennessee, great unionist southerner, put it this way. if there is one division of the state, will there not be more than one? wouldn't north america soon be just as fragmented and war prone as europe lacks 33 petty governments, a little
taxpayers getting their money's worth. >> imagine a guy in germany, probably he pays particularly if he's upper middle class or upper class, he probably pays more in total taxes than his american counterpart. though it's not entirely clear once you add value-added consumption tax, for sure he's paying more. but here's what he gets in return. he gets universal health care, high-quality. he gets a free education. from kindergarten through any master's bachelor's ph.d. program he wants and it's pretty high quality as well. he gets free retraining if he ever loses his job. he gets all the benefits like day care and things like that europe is famous for. and the person in the united states may be spending a couple of percentage points lower. but he has to save for health care. he has to save for long-term care when he gets old. he has to save for his children's college education. perhaps for high school education. and certainly for any kind of retraining he may need. so it's not entirely clear that europeans have such a bad deal. >> the question here, it is a tough decision. we are deciding
, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. when you're carrying a lot of weight, c-max has a nice little trait, you see, c-max helps you load your freight, with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. >>> i'm milissa rehberger. here's what's happening. the nra has broken its silence about the shootings in connecticut. and have pledged to help from attacks ever happening again. >>> sell its stake in a company that makes an assault rifle believed to have been used as sandy hook. and a report on the attack in benghazi has been sent to congress ahead of
's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms like ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 2013. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no jet lag. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-800-790-3801 tdd#: 1-8
to condemn this plan. others also speaking out, including germany. a senior israeli government official says prime minister benjamin netanyahu has signed off only on planning and zoning for future construction on e-1, but the bulldozers have been there tearing up the ground yesterday. now, the palestinians, of course, see this as the ultimate threat to peace, and certainly a two-state solution. the chief negotiator says nblg e-1 would destroy the two-state solution, establishing east jerusalem as the capital of palestine and practically ends the peace process and any opportunity to talk about negotiations in the future. let's bring in fred plankin who joins us from east jerusalem. this has been a red line for years. you talked about presidents from obama to george w. bush, bill clinton, all objecting to settlement on that spot and getting his assurances from israel that it wouldn't be built on, so why now? tough talking? election coming up? what happened in the u.n.? what's the feeling there? >> well, certainly the israelis have made no secret of the fact that this is a direct punitive measu
instantly. all the police in germany had trained dogs on the street. there were no robberies or assaults because people know that the dog would get them. the security is not working. children and adults need to be protected. it would be safer to have trained dogs in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: we got your points. guest: i am not sure it would be less expensive to have a handle and a dog. i grew up much of my life in europe. i understand they have strict gun control laws there. the top three in terms of fatalities until friday were in britain and germany. those were often used with assault weapons. people can get access to these weapons. host: this comes from twitter. there were some graphics this morning from "the washington post." the ban on assault weapons includes massachusetts, maryland, new york, and hawaii. 30 states require -- host: what do you make of the mental health requirements and awaiting periods? what about tightening those laws? guest: i think they will be on the table. there is probably a loophole in the system. on the concealed carry issu
the kind of transition you had in germany? today germany is to lay prosperous country. will south korea consider the north koreans to be their cousins and brothers? there is a huge disparity at this point. you can see the physical difference because of the questions of nutrition and the way they are raised. is a total state based on fear. the challenge is to figure out how to absorb water looking like two or three lost generations. host: foreign policy in review with eli lake. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independen ts. you can send us the tweet or e- mail, f twitter.com/cspanwj, journal@c-span.org. john kerry for secretary of state and chuck cale for secretary of defense -- chuck hayes cogel. how will these nominations go/ guest: chuck hagel has not been nominated yet. john kerry was announced by the white house on friday. the fact that kerry was announced does not bode well for the trial balloon of chalk .eguck hagel we have seen john mccain say they are going to vote for him. chuck hagel has been questioned by a nu
. >> eight people were killed when two small planes crashed in midair in in germany. police spokesperson said weather conditions were ideal at the time of the collision. to brazil where an inmate found himself stuck in a difficult situation. two prisoners were trying to escape the jail. the first inmate made it out but the second got stuck in a hole in the wall. prisoner guards snapped these pictures of him and local media report that a shower pipe was used to create the hole. firefighters had to rescue the prisoner using a hammer and drill. >> looked like he was really sweating that. coming up, flooded cars, damaged homes. parts of maryland were devastated by superstorm sandy. >> and blizzard like conditions in parts of europe. >> also blizzard-like conditions in the northern part of our country but here, steamy out there. areas of fog. details coming up on the forecast. look grandma, they have a hobbit menu. i know. apparently, they based an entire movie off of it. try the all-new hobbit inspired menu, only at denny's. and see "the hobbit: an unexpected journey." >> blizzards and high winds
them. laws in the u.s. don't apply to a hacking group in germany, for example. >> talk about the bigger issue. cyber security in general, because as you know leon panetta said earlier this year the next pearl harbor might be through cyber warfare. >> yeah. >> is this something that at this point people recognize? is the problem getting worse or better? >> the potential for a major strike, this pearl harbor idea he's put out there, that is not hyperbole. this could be the most efficient ay for those who want to strike our government and society or any other because it doesn't require the physical manifestations of previous terrorism where you have to go disrupt infrastructure take over aircraft do physical destruction. you can stay in your own country, reach out for almost no cost, and deploy software that can bring down utilities, hospitals. worst of all, it could squirrel financial markets. i don't think anything is a higher risk than the ability of going after financial markets and subtly causing problems not turning out the lights on the nyse but jus
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voted for rug declaring war on japan and germany. back to present-day politics, we now know that the u.s. supreme court plans to dive into one of the most talked about and emotional issues of our age. whether same-sex couples have the right to marry. the high court is taking on two cases, one involving the federal defense of marriage act, or d doma, and another involving california's proposition 8, banning same-sex marriages in that state. for analysis into these historic cases, what's going to be a historic hearing, i want to bring in kinji yoshityoshito, professor of constitutional law at new york city. great to see you. >> good to see you. >> put prop 8 aside for a second. do you believe that the supreme court will strike down doma. this is what what you've said. walk me through your thinking on that one. >> y bet. so doma is a really narrow challenge insofar as what the statute does is it says for federal purposes marriages are defined between one man and one woman. so i think it might be best to clarify this by example. so you take edie windsor, a plaintiff coming out of new york
for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with an applebaum in germany.soviet eastern m -- anne applebaum. that is a big night at 8:00 on c-span "q&a." >> now, latino leaders discuss issues that may impact of latino generation. panelists include former white house advisor to latin -- latin america, executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles, and arizona state university professor rodolfo espinoza. this event is two hours. >> good morning. we will go ahead and get started. welcome to the wilson center. this is, as you well know, a place where public policy and a research me to bring together the world of ideas with your world a policy action. very happy to have our director of the latin-american program. and of course, very pleased that this is an event we are co- sponsoring with immigration works that did most of the work for this. the president of emigration works really put the panel together, as well as very proud to co-concert arizona university. i want to acknowledge a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center. and many other good friends her
in germany had trained dogs on the street. there were no robberies or assaults because people know that the dog would get them. the security is not working. children and adults need to be protected. it would be safer to have trained dogs in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: we got your points. john fund. guest: i am not sure it would be less expensive to have a handle and a dog. i grew up much of my life in europe. i understand they have strict gun control laws there. the top three in terms of fatalities until friday were in britain and germany. those were often used with assault weapons. people can get access to these weapons. if you are a criminal or criminally insane, you do not care about the law. host: this comes from twitter. there were some graphics this morning from "the washington post." the ban on assault weapons includes massachusetts, maryland, new york, and hawaii. 30 states require -- every port of the mental health of buyers -- require a report of the mental health of buyers. what do you make of the mental health requirements and awaiting pe
. the majority of whom hailed from ireland and germany. almost half were from ireland alone. in 1855, more than 50% of the population of new york, the first port of call for the majority of immigrants, was foreign-born. but attitudes were changing. toward the end of the 19th sentry, just 1.6% of immigrants were asian. but apparently that was enough to push congress to pass the chinese exclusion act in 1882 restricting immigration from china for ten years. as public opinion turned against certain kinds of immigrants in the early 20th century, more legislative restrictions began to take hold. in 1924, the johnson-reid immigration act created a quota system. it puts caps on the number of immigrants that could come to the u.s. from a particular country. the act also included a provision that made certain immigrants ineligible for citizenship based on race or nationality. by the middle of the 20th septemberry, the face of immigration to the united states had begun to change. by the end of the 1970s, a third of the foreign-born population of the country hailed from latin america. today that trend has
the way other countries do. so we're essentially subsidizing like france and germany, for example because their governments have worked out a way to negotiate prices. so medicare, for example gets to set rates on payments to doctors and hospitals but doesn't have any power to negotiate rates on medical devices, drugs or durable medical equipment. so we don't have a market place wherein we have any leverage. ultimately, we pay more than other countries do for those things because we don't have any say. >> stephanie: also, you were talking about cost basically being arbitrary. you can pay $4,000 at one hospital. $15,000 at another. >> it should be infuriating. people should be angry about this. we have no idea what things really cost in this country. medically. so if you go to get a procedure or you have an emergency for god forbid and you end up in an emergency room, you're not price checking. you're going -- you're going to get fixed or healed. >> stephanie: i have a gushing head injury. maybe i should go shop
-distance transportation options. we did catch up to germany, france and japan. just heard this morning cioppino celebrating the 50th anniversary of their bullet train. we cannot allow china to surpass us in our next generation of infrastructure. tourists across the world will visit our high-speed rail to marvel at our civic engineering and technological prowess. this is not just at a transportation company changing the revitalization along the cities along the route. in conclusion, it is clear support the high-speed rail california. the federal program will help make it possible. what we need now is fishing. but we need now is leadership. what we need now is believed that the people of california in this country want us to invest in this type of transportation option. thank you, mr. chairman. i yield back. >> i think most of the members for joining us. welcome to join us if you think kiefer questions. we'll excuse you at this time as we bring secretary of the hood of who is witness. our second panelist is the secretary of transportation, former member of this panel from a distinguished secretar
of the will. major nato players such as germany did not play. what really turned out to be the case is absent the united states were anything but a very small, almost counterinsurgency operations in places like sierra leone ore and liberia, nato cannot really deploy and operate. it does not have the capabilities. it does not have the specialized systems like air refueling tankers and all that. the u.s. at to provide most of the curls -- cruise missiles and after a few is most of the air to ground bonds. and so even if you were to say that we're going to renegotiate the treaty to it's going to be a decade, probably to before nato countries absent the u.s. at the capabilities to really control things along the mediterranean. nothing earlier. >> host: let me give you a twitter. deadlines are often a factor in going over budget and-unforeseen consequences. >> there are all kinds of negative unforeseen consequences. the trouble is in the original pricing the unforeseen is not foreseen. because what we have none of the past seven, eight years is the program is over budget. rare exceptions. every pr
long distance transportation options. we need to catch up to germany, france and japan. just heard this morning that japan is celebrating their 50th anniversary of their bullet train. we cannot allow china to surpass us in our next generation of infrastructure. tourists from across the world will visit our high-spieled rail to marvel at our engineering and technological prowess. this is not just about transportation, but about changing the revitalization along the cities and routes. in conclusion, it's clear that i support the high-speed rail in california. the federal program will help make it possible. what we need now is vision, what we need now is leadership, what we need now is a belief that the people of california and this country want us to invest in this type of transportation option. thank you, mr. chairman. i yield back my time. >> thank you. i thank you both the members for joining us, and you're welcome now to join us be you'd like and stay for questions. we'll excuse you at this time as we bring secretary lahood up who's our next witness. our second panel, because thi
and one in germany. victor was awarded the bronze star by the united states for his committed meritorious service to his country during world war ii, a fitting honor for a patriot of victor's caliber. and this year on september 27, 2012, victor added another declaration when he was awarded the french legion of honor during a ceremony here in washington, d.c. at the french embassy. he was given the honor for his military service and helping to secure the liberation of france. the determination, bravery and selflessness of victor decarlo and so many like him is why we consider his generation the greatest. after the war, victor returned home, earning an engnoorg degree at tristate college in indiana and worked until his retirement at westinghouse in 1989. he and his wife have five children, 13 grandchildren and one greatgrandchild. i ask my colleagues to join me in celebrating an individual who is emblem attic of the greatest war, world war ii. it's truly an honor to slare victor's story with my colleagues again today. i want to commend victor decarlo for his commitment to his country and co
with a pulitzer prize winner on life in soviet east germany, poland, and hungary. from her historical narrative, send a night at 8:00 on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the rest of the program, we are going to be talking more about the shooting yesterday in newtown, connecticut at the sandy hook elementary school. 27 victims including 20 children. we have broken down the phone numbers in terms of regions of the country. we have a special line for educators and administrators. if you work in education, give us a call and give us some of your thoughts as to what happened yesterday at the sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. we've got hte map up there which whos connecticut, hartford the capital. newtown in the southwest corner near the new york border. we will keep putting the numbers up on your screen. we want to show you the front page of the local newspaper. 20 children, six adults fatally shot. adam lanza was identified as the gunman. president obama addresses a grief-stricken nation. "our hearts are broken." showing a picture that has been on a lot of di
away the guns from the people in germany. you saw the results. host: what about other kinds of gun laws? you talked about farming and officer -- arming an officer, some type of official presence in schools, but what about a bill to ban assault weapons? caller: it used to be and i'm getting mixed -- are they going to bring up banning semi- automatic rifles? there were not been used in the crime, from what i understand. host: good morning to lois, a republican. caller: it is the people we have to worry about. it is mental illness. families recognize their children as they are growing up. if that could be curtailed, i know they would hate to put them in a mental institution. i would, too, because they love their child just the same. but those children that grow up with mental illness, it does not matter how they get it, they are going to get weapons of some sort. it is not the guns that the problem, it's the people. they have to collect those mentally ill people. host: would you lock them all up? caller: no. you hear about doctors. i don't know quite, but that is what the problem is, menta
? >> tomchristopher-art. i have a gallery in new york, germany, paris. >> steve: tom christopher-art.com. is that paint? very good. back over to the curvy couch. >> gretchen: all right. thanks very much. beautiful artwork over there and that's one person's vision of the fiscal cliff, which is still not solved. >> brian: yeah. who knows? we got they are work. we were telling you about the marine stuck in mexico in a brutal prison, can't get out since august because the barrel of his gun was a little too long for the mexican gun laws, which we know are so strict. they do -- they went way overt top and chained him for the most part to his bed for months. >> gretchen: this is a photo his family got. remarkably, you have to keep in mind a lot of the prisons are run by the drug cartels. amazingly, they allowed jon hammer to call him to his parents. at least his parents are able to be in touch with him. originally the drug cartel members asked for ransom. i think they asked for 1600 bucks. but the family had not gone public yet. he's been in prison since august 15. they decided not to
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